New PDF release: Arthur Miller's The Crucible (Bloom's Guides)

By Harold Bloom

ISBN-10: 1604138157

ISBN-13: 9781604138153

Each one identify beneficial properties:
- serious essays reflecting quite a few colleges of criticism
- Notes at the contributing critics, a chronology of the author's existence, and an index
- An introductory essay by means of Harold Bloom.

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Extra resources for Arthur Miller's The Crucible (Bloom's Guides)

Sample text

Instead, Judge Hathorne enters, yelling at Corey and calling him “daft,” but he is followed by Deputy Governor Danforth and all become quiet. 34 Danforth tells Corey that he must submit his evidence in proper affidavit form and orders the attendants to take him away. Yet before any dismissal, Francis Nurse speaks up, and when Danforth tells him as well to write his plea, Nurse proclaims that the girls the judges have been relying on are frauds. This disturbs Danforth, who asks if the man realizes that he has sent four hundred people to jail so far and that seventy-two are to be hanged.

Hale asks why Proctor has been so infrequently at church and why his third child has not been baptized; Proctor explains that his poor opinion of Parris has dictated these actions, and this seems reasonable in light of what we saw of Parris in act 1. Hale still feels uncertain about these explanations, however, and asks if the couple know their commandments. Proctor proceeds to list them, but he cannot recall the commandment against committing adultery; his wife must remind him, causing more distress and pain for him to hear it pass through his wife’s lips.

As the trial records clearly establish, individual and family hostilities played a large role in much of the damaging testimony given against those accused of witchcraft. Of the ten girls who were most directly involved in crying out against the witches, only three—Betty Parris (nine years old), Abigail Williams (eleven years), and Ann Putnam (twelve years) were below the age of sexual maturity. The rest were considerably older: Mary Walcott and Elizabeth Booth were both sixteen; Elizabeth Hubbard was seventeen; Susanna Sheldon was eighteen; Mercy Lewis was nineteen; Sara Churchill and Mary Warren (Proctor’s servant) were twenty.

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Arthur Miller's The Crucible (Bloom's Guides) by Harold Bloom


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